Photochemistry and photobiology utilises a very narrow region of the electromagnetic spectrum 200nm to 1400nm. During PBM phototherapy, laser light is absorbed by photoacceptor molecules within the body and cells and the protein Cytochrome c Oxidase enzyme is responsible for initiating electron transfer within the mitochondria of the cell, for the production of chemical energy molecules (ATP) necessary for the cell to function and regenerate (Karu and Afanasyeva 1995). Stronger responses to PBM therapy, have been observed in cellular laboratory studies when the intracellular PH is low and the redox potential is shifted towards a more oxidized direction in the case of injured or diseased tissues.
Clinical application of laser PBM therapy using varying wavelengths and frequencies has been shown to instigate chemical signals that modulate and integrate physiological processes involving immune defence, growth and repair and reduction of inflammation and pain (Pienta and Coffey 1991).
Blue light within the 400-470nm range has now brought a new dimension to wound healing and chronically infected tissues, due to the antimicrobial effects of blue light on viruses e.g. Herpes Simplex and Zoster and on a wide range of bacteria and in particular, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) commonly termed Golden Staph. (C.S. Enwemeka et al 2009).

PBM therapy ( previously termed low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been utilised in clinical practice worldwide for more than 40 years and has proven to be a safe, risk free and non-invasive therapy to facilitate faster healing after injury or surgery and during the rehabilitation period to optimize pain relief and aid physical function and recovery

Pre-COVID19 clinical recording without face masks

Pre-COVID19 clinical recording without face masks

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